Category: On Books

Sujata Massey’s — The widows of Malabar Hill *****

Sujata Massey’s — The widows of Malabar Hill *****

Set in Mumbai in the 1920’s, Perveen works with her father in his law office, the only female solicitor in all of the city. When the Muslim women on Malabar Hill become widows, only Perveen can enter their section of the house to explain a document they’ve signed giving away their wealth.

This not only leads to a murder, but events from Perveen’s past failed marriage haunt her. A tale of intrigue with insight into both the Parsi and Muslim lives of the era.

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Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendour of silence ******

Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendour of silence ******

Once Sam completes a rescue mission in Burma during 1942, he heads to Rudrakot after a plea from his mother back in Seattle, to find out what happened to his brother. In Rudrokot, he boards with the local Tamil political agent where he is drawn to Mila, the agent’s daughter who is expected to marry the state’s prince. Battling the loss of his brother, his growing love for Mila, a wound from his time in Burma, and the prejudice the British and Indians hold against mixed relationships, Sam discovers he cannot win all he desires.

Lisa See’s — The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane *****

Lisa See’s — The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane *****

With a through line about pu’er, a tea plucked from ancient tea trees, Li-yan is the first Akha girl from her Chinese hill tribe to be educated. Instead of furthering her studies, she drops everything for her childhood sweetheart whom her parents disapprove of. Together they seek the child Li-yan was forced to leave in an orphanage before they leave for Thialand. During her absence, her poor village prospers from the sudden popularity of pu’er while Li-yan becomes destitute from her opium addicted husband. She hasn’t forgotten the daughter she was forced to give up, but her life begins to change.

This is the second Lisa See book I’ve reviewed, but I’ve read all her books and there isn’t one I wouldn’t give a five out of five.

Fredrik Backman’s — Bear Town *****

Fredrik Backman’s — Bear Town *****

Who’d ever thought I’d be giving a novel set around an ice hockey team a five out of five or even read such a book? I asked myself this very question when I began the story, but it didn’t take long to be engulfed in this small town tale that was about a far bigger issue than a junior team aiming to win a national championships. Continue reading “Fredrik Backman’s — Bear Town *****”

Kate Morton mysteries *****

Kate Morton mysteries *****

If you’re curious about why a child was abandoned on the dock in a foreign country, or want to know why the person a character trusts more than anyone commits a horrendous crime, then Kate Moreton’s the author for you.

The Secret Keeper, Forgotten Garden and House at Riverton were all gripping novels I couldn’t put down. Not only were they well written, but I was hooked right till the unpredictable ends of all three.

Arthur Golden’s — Memoirs of a Geisha *****

Arthur Golden’s — Memoirs of a Geisha *****

Still a child in a poor fishing village, Sayuri is sold into slavery to a Kyoto geisha house. As she grows, she is groomed to become a geisha and is soon visiting teahouses dressed in fine kimonos and competing with a jealous rival.

She falls in love, but when it is time for her virginity to be auctioned, it is another man who bids the highest. Although she is a popular geisha, when war breaks out and the geisha houses are forced to close, she has little money.