Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

When Billy disappears and Avery admits to killing six other children, everyone assumes he also killed Billy. His mother, standing by the window overlooking the Moors, is the only one convinced he’s still alive.

Meanwhile, her grandson, Steven searches with his friend, Lewis over the Moors looking for a possible grave, but all he finds is the bones of a sheep. What strategy can he use next to discover Billy’s whereabouts so his grandmother can find closure?

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Julie H. Ferguson’s — Book Magic

Julie H. Ferguson’s — Book Magic

Book Magic is an excellent read if you’re ready to publish. The book delves into: what to expect if you go the traditional route; what kinds of books are better to self-publish; pitching your work; and copyright, to name a few.

With forty years experience, the author has six books published on writing as well as her own fiction and non-fiction works. With headings and sub-headings this is a great reference book, I can refer back to when needed.

Camilla Gibb’s — Sweetness in the belly *****

Camilla Gibb’s — Sweetness in the belly *****

After Lily’s English parents are killed in an alleyway in Morocco, she is brought up by the Great Abdal so that Lily has no affiliation with England. She trains as a nurse and moves to Ethiopia where she lives with Amina while working with Doctor Aziz. Soon the pair form a bond but political upheaval separates them when Lily flees to England, a country she has never known. While Amina searches for her husband, Lily desperately searches for Aziz.

Ami MacKay’s — The Virgin Cure *****

Ami MacKay’s — The Virgin Cure *****

When Moth escapes the cruel servitude of Mrs Wentworth, she ends up in a brothel where the madam sees her as an innocent prize. Although she is warned of the dangers, she is anxious to escape from the hard life she has endured.

I couldn’t help see a parallel between this book and the belief in some countries that a virgin will cure someone of AIDs.

If you enjoy this book, don’t miss MacKay’s The Birth House which is equally as good.

Sujata Massey’s — The widows of Malabar Hill *****

Sujata Massey’s — The widows of Malabar Hill *****

Set in Mumbai in the 1920’s, Perveen works with her father in his law office, the only female solicitor in all of the city. When the Muslim women on Malabar Hill become widows, only Perveen can enter their section of the house to explain a document they’ve signed giving away their wealth.

This not only leads to a murder, but events from Perveen’s past failed marriage haunt her. A tale of intrigue with insight into both the Parsi and Muslim lives of the era.

Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendour of silence ******

Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendour of silence ******

Once Sam completes a rescue mission in Burma during 1942, he heads to Rudrakot after a plea from his mother back in Seattle, to find out what happened to his brother. In Rudrokot, he boards with the local Tamil political agent where he is drawn to Mila, the agent’s daughter who is expected to marry the state’s prince. Battling the loss of his brother, his growing love for Mila, a wound from his time in Burma, and the prejudice the British and Indians hold against mixed relationships, Sam discovers he cannot win all he desires.

Lisa See’s — The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane *****

Lisa See’s — The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane *****

With a through line about pu’er, a tea plucked from ancient tea trees, Li-yan is the first Akha girl from her Chinese hill tribe to be educated. Instead of furthering her studies, she drops everything for her childhood sweetheart whom her parents disapprove of. Together they seek the child Li-yan was forced to leave in an orphanage before they leave for Thialand. During her absence, her poor village prospers from the sudden popularity of pu’er while Li-yan becomes destitute from her opium addicted husband. She hasn’t forgotten the daughter she was forced to give up, but her life begins to change.

This is the second Lisa See book I’ve reviewed, but I’ve read all her books and there isn’t one I wouldn’t give a five out of five.