Tag: book reviews

Joan Clark’s — An audience of chairs *****

Joan Clark’s — An audience of chairs *****

Moranna lives in a Cape Bretton farmhouse in a small village. She is often alone when her partner, Bun is away working on the ferries between islands. Although she is considered mad by the locals, she decides to attend her estranged daughter’s impending wedding in Halifax when she learns the news. But will she be welcomed?

Juhea Kim’s—Beasts of the little land *****

Juhea Kim’s—Beasts of the little land *****

In 1919 Pyongyang, Jade is sold to Madam Silver who will train her as a courtesan. But when Madam Silver’s daughter, Luna is raped, she sends Luna, Lotus, and Jade to her cousin, Dani in Seoul to hide Luna’s pregnancy. Aunt Dani continues their training while JungHo heads south to Seoul in search of a better life after his father’s death. Under Japanese occupation, underground movements form in the hope of gaining independence. 

This novel takes place over fifty years following the lives of these characters and Korea’s struggle to break free from Japan’s strangling grip.

Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

When Billy disappears and Avery admits to killing six other children, everyone assumes he also killed Billy. His mother, standing by the window overlooking the Moors, is the only one convinced Billy is still alive.

Meanwhile, her grandson, Steven searches with his friend Lewis over the Moors looking for a possible grave, but all he finds is the bones of a sheep. What strategy can he use next to discover Billy’s whereabouts so his grandmother can find closure?

Chitra Banderjee Divakaruni’s—Before we visit the goddess

Chitra Banderjee Divakaruni’s—Before we visit the goddess

This is a tale of three generations of women and the mistakes and hardships they face both in India and in the U.S. 

Sabitri dreams of going to college so she can rise above her mother’s poverty-stricken life. She is given the opportunity by a rich family her mother makes mitai for, but her dream evaporates because of her ill-fated love. When her daughter, Bela is in college she is distressed by Bela’s relationship with Sanjay, a political Bengali rebel. Bela abandons her studies and flees to the U.S. to reconnect with Sanjay—the second generation to forsake her studies for love. In Bela’s daughter’s teenage years, will she do the same?