Tag: book reviews

Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

Belinda Bauer’s — Black Lands *****

When Billy disappears and Avery admits to killing six other children, everyone assumes he also killed Billy. His mother, standing by the window overlooking the Moors, is the only one convinced Billy is still alive.

Meanwhile, her grandson, Steven searches with his friend Lewis over the Moors looking for a possible grave, but all he finds is the bones of a sheep. What strategy can he use next to discover Billy’s whereabouts so his grandmother can find closure?

Chitra Banderjee Divakaruni’s—Before we visit the goddess

Chitra Banderjee Divakaruni’s—Before we visit the goddess

This is a tale of three generations of women and the mistakes and hardships they face both in India and in the U.S. 

Sabitri dreams of going to college so she can rise above her mother’s poverty-stricken life. She is given the opportunity by a rich family her mother makes mitai for, but her dream evaporates because of her ill-fated love. When her daughter, Bela is in college she is distressed by Bela’s relationship with Sanjay, a political Bengali rebel. Bela abandons her studies and flees to the U.S. to reconnect with Sanjay—the second generation to forsake her studies for love. In Bela’s daughter’s teenage years, will she do the same?

Lisa See’s — Shanghai Girls *****

Lisa See’s — Shanghai Girls *****

Two sisters, Pearl and May, lead exciting lives in Shanghai until their father’s once rich lifestyle is gambled away. Their father is forced to sell his daughters as wives to men in California seeking wives. Escaping from invading soldiers, they journey across to U.S.A. to begin new lives with the strangers they’ve married. This is Lisa See at her best.

Timothy Bottoms’ — Conspiracy of Silence *****

Timothy Bottoms’ — Conspiracy of Silence *****

This is a history of Queensland’s early European settlement that I was never taught. The novel documents an era during the 1800s when pastoralists claimed millions of hectares of Queensland’s interior for cattle and sheep grazing. When Aborigines objected, speared a sheep or approached waterholes they’d used for thousands of years, graziers either demanded the native police “disperse” the Aborigines or killed most of the tribe themselves.

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