Category: Non-fiction 5 out of 5s

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven fallen feathers *****

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven fallen feathers *****

Canadian Journalist, Tanya Talaga chronicles the lives and deaths of seven First Nation teens in Thunder Bay who lost their lives after moving from remote Ontario communities to attend secondary school in the city.

In this non-fiction account, we learn about life in Thunder Bay for First Nation teens, about the Aboriginal parents and their communities who come together to search for the children when they first disappear, and their contact with police and how the Thunder Bay police handle each case.

This is a well written, must read for all Canadians so we grasp the systemic racist culture within the police force as well as the government and communities at large.

Sahana Singh’s — The educational heritage of ancient India *****

Sahana Singh’s — The educational heritage of ancient India *****

This book explores the many universities that flourished all over India from the 6th century onwards, and how students travelled from many parts of Asia to study in these prestigious institutions. At its height, universities specialized in subjects from mathematics, medicine and logic to the arts and military training. Much of this knowledge was translated into Arabic and then from Arabic into European languages where the knowledge was claimed as their own.

Continue reading “Sahana Singh’s — The educational heritage of ancient India *****”
Susan Morgan’s — Bombay Anna *****

Susan Morgan’s — Bombay Anna *****

This is a fascinating biography of Anna Leonowens who pretended to be British, covered up her past, even from her children, and became the nanny to the King of Siam’s children. She travelled the world, then settle in Canada to raise her family during the Victorian era when women stayed at home.

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Mark Sakamoto’s — Forgiveness

Mark Sakamoto’s — Forgiveness

Forgiveness is a memoir to two Canadian families — the Sakamotos from Vancouver and the MacLeans from the Magdalen Islands in the Gulf of St Lawrence. When war breaks out, Ralph MacLean enlists, and not long after he arrives in Hong Kong he is captured, and spends most of the war in a prison camp. Meanwhile, the British Columbian government is eager to remove the prosperous Japanese community from Powell Street and expels them from their homes into the B.C. interior as farm labour. A generation later, these two families come together when their children marry.

This is an emotional journey, beautifully written that I didn’t want to end.