Category: Canadian 5 out of 5s

Mary Lawson’s — A town called Solace *****

Mary Lawson’s — A town called Solace *****

Aging Mrs. Orchard has gone into hospital and Clara, her neighbour’s daughter is feeding her capricious cat. At the same time, Clara’s teenage sister, Rose has an argument with her mother and leaves. The small community of Solace in Northern Ontario search the woods, but there is no sign of Rose. Clara stands by the window awaiting her sister’s return when she spies a stranger entering Mrs. Orchard’s house. Who is this man? Why are her parents lying to her? And why hasn’t Mrs. Orchard returned?

This novel is off to a slow start in the first two short chapters, but the small town setting, the characters and Lawson’s wonderful story telling had me engrossed by the third chapter.

Sharon Bala’s — The boat people *****

Sharon Bala’s — The boat people *****

Mahindan’s life in Sri Lanka where he was a mechanic was at the mercy of both the Lankan government and the Tigers before he escapes by boat to Canada. Grace, a hard line adjudicator has a tough stance on those who don’t arrive through the proper channels. And Priya, a lawyer is dragged into working with the refugees when she wants to specialize in corporate law. What will happen to the refugees who are turned back? How will the Canadian officials’ characters change after working with the Tamil boat people for months?

This 2018 Canada Reads contented book is the best book on the crisis in Lanka (that still continues today for anyone not Buddhist) and what Tamils endure to stay alive.

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven fallen feathers *****

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven fallen feathers *****

Canadian Journalist, Tanya Talaga chronicles the lives and deaths of seven First Nation teens in Thunder Bay who lost their lives after moving from remote Ontario communities to attend secondary school in the city.

In this non-fiction account, we learn about life in Thunder Bay for First Nation teens, about the Aboriginal parents and their communities who come together to search for the children when they first disappear, and their contact with police and how the Thunder Bay police handle each case.

This is a well written, must read for all Canadians so we grasp the systemic racist culture within the police force as well as the government and communities at large.

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Klara and the sun

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Klara and the sun

I fell in love with this heart warming futuristic story because it was so different from anything else I’d read. 

Klara and Rosa are on display in a store window when Josie comes by and promises to take Klara home. While she waits for Josie’s return, she realises that not all AF’s have the ability she has — an insight into human emotions. She keenly observes all she can until Josie and her mother finally return and purchase her. But Klara soon learns that Josie is often seriously ill and her older sister has already died. Can she help her get well? And will the sun keep its end of a bargain as Klara has begged it to?

FYI Ishiguro is also the author of The remains of the day and Never let me go, both made into movies.