Tag: Japanese setting

Keigo Higashino’s—Malice*****

Keigo Higashino’s—Malice*****

If you’re a mystery buff, you’ll want to read Malice. 

When Nonoguchi’s friend, successful author, Hidaka is murdered in his home office, Detective Kaga is assigned to the case. He was once a teacher at the same school as Nonoguchi, and it doesn’t take him long to suspect Nonoguchi murdered the friend he has known since his school days. But Detective Kaga needs a motive otherwise the case will not hold up in court. What could Nonoguchi’s reason be to murder a friend who has helped him during his middle school years and introduced him to an editor so his children’s stories can be published? Detective Kaga is persistent, but can he outwit Nonoguchi?

Arthur Golden’s — Memoirs of a Geisha *****

Arthur Golden’s — Memoirs of a Geisha *****

When Sayuri is a child in a poor fishing village, she is sold into slavery to a Kyoto geisha house. As she grows, she is groomed to become a geisha and is soon visiting teahouses dressed in fine kimonos and competing with a jealous rival.

Continue reading “Arthur Golden’s — Memoirs of a Geisha *****”
Asha Lemmie’s — Fifty words for rain

Asha Lemmie’s — Fifty words for rain

A few years after the end of WW11, Noriko stands at the entrance to her grandmother’s mansion in Kyoto. Her mother has driven away, and she has no choice but to enter the property with her few belongings. Her grandmother hides her in the attic where she is ordered to stay and not venture into any other part of the house. No one should see her because she is an illegitimate child to an American father ruining the family’s prestigious name. When she is ten, her half-brother, Akiri arrives after his father’s death and her lonely life begins to improve, but will their stern grandmother allow Noriko to escape her seclusion?

Gail Tsukiyama’s — The samurai’s garden *****

Gail Tsukiyama’s — The samurai’s garden *****

In early 1938 Stephan is ill and leaves Hong Kong for Tarumi where he stays in his parents’ seaside Japanese house to recuperate. At first, he feels isolated in the village and finds Matsu who tends to his needs, too reserved, but as his health improves so does his relationship with Matsu. While he swims in the sea or paints, Stephan-san grows concerned as Japan invades China and its armies rampage south. But he forgets these worries when Matsu introduces him to his friend, Sachi who lives in Yamaguchi, a mountainside village for lepers. As the year draws to a close, is it safe for Chinese to remain in Japan? Will he be able to part from the close relationships he’s formed with Matsu and Sachi?