Tag: books

Jane Harper’s — The lost man *****

Jane Harper’s — The lost man *****

Here’s one for those who love mysteries. When Cam is discovered dead from dehydration near a stockman’s grave in outback Queensland, his brothers, Nathan and Bud are suspicious. Cam’s well stocked car is parked nine kilometres away, but he had no water with him. Cam was well aware of the dangers in the forty plus degree Australian semi-desert. Something doesn’t add up. But when the police arrive on the scene and take his body for an autopsy, they find nothing to suggest murder. But Cam is not convinced and his son, Xander is also asking questions. What he discovers is not only exactly what happened, but a whole other life his brother lived that he was unaware of.

Anosh Irani’s — The parcel *****

Anosh Irani’s — The parcel *****

This is the story of how Madhu, a hijra, survives in Mumbai’s notorious red-light district. Madhu is too old for prostitution, so begs on the street until called for a special job when the parcel arrives. Continue reading “Anosh Irani’s — The parcel *****”

Rohinton Mistry’s — Family matters *****

Rohinton Mistry’s — Family matters *****

Nariman, the aging patriarch of a Parsi family, is shuffled from one family household to another as his ability to care for himself deteriorates. Mistry takes us on a journey through the lives of this Bombay family that is both sad and often funny.

In his classic style, this is probably my favourite of his novels to date, though not the only one I’ve enjoyed.

Yangsze Choo’s — The night tiger *****

Yangsze Choo’s — The night tiger *****

At Ji Lin’s part time job as a dance hall girl in Ipoh, she stumbles upon a preserved finger left by one of her dance partners. With the finger in her possession, frightening events happen. The previous finger owner dies and strange dreams of a boy, Yi recur. With the help of her stepbrother, Shin, Ji Lin tries to get rid of the finger. At the same time, Ren, a Malayan houseboy is searching for the finger because he believes he must bury his previous boss’s digit with the rest of his body. Another death occurs that locals believe is caused by a weretiger and when Ji Lin and Shin tidy Batu Gajah hospital’s storeroom, they discover other preserved fingers are missing. What is it about the increasing number of deaths in the district, the fingers, Ji Lin’s contact with Yi through her dreams and the houseboy, Ren that connects them in this mysterious and sometimes dream like world?

Amulya Malladi’s — A breath of fresh air *****

Amulya Malladi’s — A breath of fresh air *****

While Anjali waits hours for her new husband to collect her from the Bhopal railway station, a toxic gas explosion sends people fleeing. Anjali wakes in a hospital bed and is determined to divorce her unfaithful husband. Unlike many others who died from the explosion, she believes she only suffers from serious asthma, but doesn’t realize the full repercussions of the accident until years later. Continue reading “Amulya Malladi’s — A breath of fresh air *****”

Yoko Ogawa’s — Hotel Iris

Yoko Ogawa’s — Hotel Iris

Mari quits school after her father’s death to help her demanding mother run the Hotel Iris. Behind the reception desk she witnesses a prostitute scream abuse and storm out of the hotel, then hears the voice of the man from the hotel room and is intrigued. She spots him in the street one day and follows.

There are rumours about this man — that he killed his wife, but Mari can’t quell her attraction. Will she be safe with a man so much older than her? Will the rumours prove true? Or will something darker occur?

Read the Guardian’s review on the book cover — this is absolutely true of this macabre tale that I couldn’t put down.

Emma Donoghue’s — The wonder *****

Emma Donoghue’s — The wonder *****

Lib, an English nurse, arrives in an Irish village in the 1850s to keep watch over Anna so as to confirm that she doesn’t eat. The child’s fast is driving the faithful on pilgrimages to her house and Lib is suspicious.

This is not only a book about the politics of religion, but blind faith and Lib is determined to get to the bottom of why Anna fasts.

How did this author keep me engrossed in her tale when most of the story is set in Anna O’Donnell’s bedroom? It’s no wonder, this book is beautifully written as well as an intriguing tale.