Tag: books

Yoko Ogawa’s—The memory police *****

Yoko Ogawa’s—The memory police *****

A novelist lives alone on a remote island since her parents have been removed by the memory police. It is not only people who have disappeared, but objects too—hats, the ferry service to the northern island—things that are also removed from the inhabitants’ memories. Every now and then when she wakes, she senses something else has disappeared. 

Continue reading “Yoko Ogawa’s—The memory police *****”
Joan Clark’s — An audience of chairs *****

Joan Clark’s — An audience of chairs *****

Moranna lives in a Cape Bretton farmhouse in a small village. She is often alone when her partner, Bun is away working on the ferries between islands. Although she is considered mad by the locals, she decides to attend her estranged daughter’s impending wedding in Halifax when she learns the news. But will she be welcomed?

Lissa Evans’—Crooked heart *****

Lissa Evans’—Crooked heart *****

You might think this is yet another novel set in England during World War 11 and read no further. But don’t be fooled. This is a tale like no other I’ve read before, full of humour with an odd and dubious list of characters.

Ten-year-old Noel lives with his aging godmother until she dies, when he’s sent as an evacuee outside of London. There he’s paired with Vee, a single mother who is struggling to keep a roof over her head for herself, her helpless mother, and useless son, Donald. Nineteen-year-old Donald has a heart condition and can’t join up, but soon discovers an illegal way to make large sums of cash that he doesn’t share with his mother. Vee keeps failing at schemes to make money until she realizes that Noel isn’t the empty headed child she though he was. This well written novel is full of tongue-in-cheek laughs. 

Colleen McCullough’s — The independence of Miss Mary Bennett *****

Colleen McCullough’s — The independence of Miss Mary Bennett *****

I remember Mary as the Bennett sister who couldn’t sing, but twenty years on from the end of Austin’s Pride and Prejudice, Mary’s life continues. In her desperation for independence, she investigates the plight of the English poor only to find herself in danger.

I wasn’t expecting this to be an engaging tale, but I should have known better because this Australian author has never disappointed me—a book I couldn’t put down when I needed a light read.