Tag: fiction book

Katherine Marsh’s — Nowhere boy *****

Katherine Marsh’s — Nowhere boy *****

Thirteen year old Max is not one bit happy his parents have moved from Washington D.C. to spend a year working in Brussels. To make matters worse, Max has to repeat grade six in a French school. The boys in his class make fun of him and the only one who helps him with his French is Farah. But Max’s life takes a dramatic turn when he discovers a Syrian refugee hiding in their cellar. Will he tell his parents or will be inspired by a neighbour, Albert Jonnart who hid a Jewish child during the WW11?

A well crafted YA novel that examines the challengers facing refugees and the fear and prejudice in the countries they move to.

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Janie Chang’s — Three souls *****

Janie Chang’s — Three souls *****

While Leiyin observes her own funeral, she is confused as to why she cannot enter into the afterlife. Her two other souls join her on a journey back in time to solve her dilemma. In spite of her unwanted marriage and domineering father, it is her own actions that she must make amends for before she can enter the afterlife.

Colleen McCullough’s — The independence of Miss Mary Bennett *****

Colleen McCullough’s — The independence of Miss Mary Bennett *****

I remember Mary as the Bennett sister who couldn’t sing, but twenty years on from the end of Austin’s Pride and Prejudice, Mary’s life continues. In her desperation for independence, she investigates the plight of the English poor only to find herself in danger.

I wasn’t expecting this to be an engaging tale, but I should have known better because this Australian author has never disappointed me. A book I couldn’t put down when I needed a light read.

Camilla Gibb’s — Sweetness in the belly *****

Camilla Gibb’s — Sweetness in the belly *****

After Lily’s English parents are killed in an alleyway in Morocco, she is brought up by the Great Abdal so that Lily has no affiliation with England. She trains as a nurse and moves to Ethiopia where she lives with Amina while working with Doctor Aziz. Soon the pair form a bond but political upheaval separates them when Lily flees to England, a country she has never known. While Amina searches for her husband, Lily desperately searches for Aziz.

Ami MacKay’s — The Virgin Cure *****

Ami MacKay’s — The Virgin Cure *****

When Moth escapes the cruel servitude of Mrs Wentworth, she ends up in a brothel where the madam sees her as an innocent prize. Although she is warned of the dangers, she is anxious to escape from the hard life she has endured.

I couldn’t help see a parallel between this book and the belief in some countries that a virgin will cure someone of AIDs.

If you enjoy this book, don’t miss MacKay’s The Birth House which is equally as good.