Tag: Indian author

Sitadevi Yogendra’s—Yoga for Women Simplified *****

Sitadevi Yogendra’s—Yoga for Women Simplified *****

This is a book that’s been with me for decades that I recently reread. It contains photographs of yoga positions with well explained instructions. What makes each pose even better, are the details about which parts of the body each pose benefits.

Continue reading “Sitadevi Yogendra’s—Yoga for Women Simplified *****”
Vandana Shiva’s — Biopiracy *****

Vandana Shiva’s — Biopiracy *****

This non-fiction book briefly examines the North’s attitude over the last 500 years. During colonialism the North claimed the rest of the world was empty and theirs to plunder. That nature was a non-entity from which to gain profit. 

The focus however, is on the present under globalization and “free” trade agreements and how the North has patented plants and animals from the South in its quest for profit. What has been the impact on societies and the planet will astound any reader of this important book. 

Sujata Massey’s – The widows of Malabar Hill

Sujata Massey’s – The widows of Malabar Hill

In Mumbai in the 1920’s, Perveen works with her father in his law office—the only female solicitor in the entire city. When the Muslim women on Malabar Hill become widows, only Perveen can enter their secluded section of the house to explain a document they’ve signed giving away their wealth. This not only leads to a murder, but unwelcomed events surface from Perveen’s past failed marriage before she finished her degree.

A tale of intrigue with insight into both Parsi and Muslim lives of the era.

Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendor of silence

Indu Sundaresan’s — The splendor of silence

Once Sam completes a rescue mission in Burma during 1942, he heads to Rudrakot after a plea from his mother back in Seattle, to find out what happened to his brother. In Rudrokot, he boards with the local Tamil political agent where he is drawn to Mila, the agent’s daughter who is expected to marry the state’s prince. Battling the loss of his brother, his growing love for Mila, a wound from his time in Burma, and the prejudice the British and Indians hold against mixed relationships, Sam discovers he cannot win all he desires.