Tag: non-fiction book

Vandana Shiva’s — Biopiracy *****

Vandana Shiva’s — Biopiracy *****

This non-fiction book briefly examines the North’s attitude over the last 500 years. During colonialism the North claimed the rest of the world was empty and theirs to plunder; that nature was a non-entity from which to gain profit.

The focus however, is on the present under globalization and “free” trade agreements and how the North has patented plants and animals from the South in its quest for profit. What has been the impact on societies and the planet will astound any reader of this important book.

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M. Wylie Blanchet’s — The curve of time *****

M. Wylie Blanchet’s — The curve of time *****

After being widowed in 1927, Blanchet took off with her children as skipper in her seven metre boat every summer to tour deserted inlets and abandoned First Nation villages. She cruised from her home on Vancouver Island along the Straight of Georgia between the Gulf Islands braving storms and engine breakdowns single handed.

This is a wonderful memoir that made me feel I was on an extended holiday to these isolated and pristine locations.

Timothy Bottoms’ — Conspiracy of Silence *****

Timothy Bottoms’ — Conspiracy of Silence *****

This is a history of Queensland’s early European settlement that I was never taught. The novel documents an era during the 1800s when pastoralists claimed millions of hectares of Queensland’s interior for cattle and sheep grazing. When Aborigines objected, speared a sheep or approached waterholes they’d used for thousands of years, graziers either demanded the native police “disperse” the Aborigines or killed most of the tribe themselves.

This is a difficult truth, revealing massacre after massacre of thousands of Aborigines perpetrated by white settlers and/or native police while the state government turned a blind eye because many of the government officials had vested interests in the grazier properties.

A must read for those who don’t want a glossed over version of history.

Michael Lewis’ — Boomerang ******

Michael Lewis’ — Boomerang ******

If you’re interested in the financial bubble that burst across the world during 2002 to 2008 then this book will interest you. As well, if you’re no financial expert with a grip on the jargon, this is a must read.

Lewis’ journey examines, not only the United States’ debacle, but he travels to Iceland, Greece, Ireland and Germany to unlock the mystery of why these countries suffered the worst.

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven Fallen Feathers *****

Tanya Talaga’s — Seven Fallen Feathers *****

Journalist, Tanya Talaga chronicles the lives and deaths of seven First Nation teens in Thunder Bay who lost their lives after moving from remote Ontario communities to attend secondary school in the city.

In this non-fiction account, we learn about life in Thunder Bay for First Nation teens; about the parents and First Nation communities who come together to search for the children when they disappear; and their contact with police and how the Thunder Bay RCMP handle each case.

This is a well written, must read for all Canadians so we grasp the systemic culture within the police force, the community, and the government at large.

Karen L. Kristjanson’s — Co-Parenting from the inside out *****

Karen L. Kristjanson’s — Co-Parenting from the inside out *****

In a world where a high percentage of marriages end in divorce, it’s surprising that books of this genre haven’t been published before. No wonder Dundurn Press snapped up this practical guide to surviving a divorce and bringing up children who live part time in two separate homes. Continue reading “Karen L. Kristjanson’s — Co-Parenting from the inside out *****”